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"Gold Medal Winner for Recycling," says, Mike McCardell on The Last Word segment featuring CCEC Member Randi-Lee Taylor and her Simply Barefoot Garden business.  Watch the video: 

 

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Interested in increasing your awareness about the scams that target Canadians? The Competition Bureau Canada has put together information about some of the top scams in the country. Check out The Little Black Book of Scams (2nd edition) and learn tips, red flags, and detailed information about different scams.

Here are three of some of the general red flags to watch out for, according to the Competition Bureau.

  1. Spelling mistakes: Be skeptical of emails, messages or websites that contain misspelled common words; grammar errors that make it difficult to read or expressions that are used incorrectly. Email and web addresses should also be examined closely to see if there are subtle mistakes or differences.
  2. Personal information request: Fraudsters may ask potential victims to provide more personal or financial information than is required for the transaction or discussion. Be suspicious if someone asks for copies of your passport, driver’s licence and social insurance number, or birth date, especially if you don’t know the requestor.
  3. Unsolicited calls: You might get a call from someone claiming that you have a virus on your computer, you owe taxes or there has been fraudulent activity in your bank accounts. Know that legitimate organizations will not call you directly. Hang up and call the organization yourself using the number from a trustworthy source, such as the phone book, their website, or even invoices and account statements.

Every year, Canadians lose millions of dollars to scammers. To find out more about scams in Canada and how you can protect yourself, visit The Little Black Book of Scams. A PDF version is also available.

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Get out and VOTE in the upcoming municipal elections.  Voting day is October 20th.  Advance Polls are now open. 

Read the Vancouver Voter's Guide to learn more about the candidates and their positions on issues that are important to you, like housing.  Attend candidate meetings.  

Learn more at the City of Vancouver website. 

 

 

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Which welfare model should we trial or adopt in BC? How are other countries addressing the welfare needs of their citizens? Here are a few recent announcements:   

  • Finland announced that it is stopping their trial of the Universal Basic Income (UBI) program at the end of 2018.  They are looking into alternative welfare schemes including the Universal Credit model.  
  • Read how the current Universal Basic Income trials are falling short of holding society-changing potential. Is Basic Income being setup to fail? 
  • The United Kingdom introduced a Universal Credit program in 2013,  However, a recent article in the Economist suggests that the roll-out is not going well.  

  What do you think we should be doing in BC?  Add Your Comments...

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Make good on housing commitment!   

The federal Liberal government needs to make good on its promise to declare housing a "fundamental human right" under Canadian law as part of its forthcoming national housing strategy.  Sign the open letter to the Prime Minister calling for a legislated right to housing in Canada.  

Today, over 1.7 million Canadian households are living in unsafe, unsuitable or unaffordable housing without better options available to them.   Widespread homelessness and lack of access to adequate housing, in so affluent a country as Canada is a critical human rights issue facing all levels of government.  Did you know that  Canada made a commitment under the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development to eliminate homelessness by 2030?  Also, what we heard from the federal government's consultation process over the past few months indicates consensus that legislation must explicitly recognize the right to housing. Draft legislation has been developed by civil society and experts outlining key points for the legislation.  This is the first time that legislation implementing the right to housing has been contemplated in Canada and it is critical that it be done right.  Let us know what you think. Please comment.  Read more.

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DEADLINE June 8, 2018!  
Make sure your voice is heard!  

The Government of Canada believes all Canadians deserve access to housing that meets their needs and that they can afford. A human rights-based approach to housing focuses on ensuring that every Canadian has access to a safe and affordable place to call home. It is grounded in the core principles of accountability, participation, non-discrimination and inclusion.

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Meet CCEC Member Tani Tupechka

Accessing good food during illness and the leg hold trap of poverty is the hardest thing I’ve ever faced.  In 2009, I was forced off work and onto disability because of a chronic muscle illness. Food took on a whole new meaning for me.

At the recent Vancouver Food Summit, a Coast Salish elder said, “food is life.” So true.  And food is also love and fueled by communities working together.

Each of us has an important role to play in food security - including community organizations like CCEC. I’ve done a good deal of food activism at the community level; in gardens, kitchens and educational initiatives.  I saw how access to good, affordable food is a huge barrier for many people – as it was for me.  NGOs and organizations need to receive the support to put even more energy and resources towards this key issue.

Accessing local food programs became key for my survival.  I had support from people in my community, but if it wasn’t for the financial help that CCEC provided, I would have gone hungry many times.  On top of that, in the spirit of community, the workers at CCEC always treated me with respect when I needed help, especially Atilio Alvarez.  He never once treated me like I was poor or untrustworthy, instead he was always kind, supportive and caring.  I am super grateful to him and the many people in our communities that helped me when I needed it most. 

Recently, I’ve been able to return to the community work I love and my own struggles have focused my energies on food justice.  Food security is at the heart of social and environmental justice. It ensures that people not only survive, but begin to thrive.  

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October 19th is International Credit Union Day, a day to celebrate the positive 'self-help' story of citizen based financial institutions. In many ways the story in BC is a very good one, but the consolidation trend of the last 25 years has a less optimistic face.

Ross Gentleman's OpEd piece in today's Vancouver Sun sets that out for all BC credit union members to consider. http://vancouversun.com/opinion/opinion-small-credit-unions-threatened-by-consolidation

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Babes in the Woods Eatery Receives Support from the Galiano Community Loan Fund

Meet CCEC member, Galiano’s Chef Lisa who opened her Babes in the Woods Eatery in 2014.  She secured a $10,000 guaranteed loan from CCEC member, Galiano Community Loan Fund (GCLF), which allowed her to open the restaurant and buy the equipment. 

Lisa heard about the Galiano Community Loan Fund a few years ago when “They helped Ginga buy DJ equipment so he could pursue his career professionally and I thought that was really cool.”  When she was opening her restaurant, with very little money, her plan was to get a case of tomatoes, turn it into something and sell it, then buy two cases of tomatoes, and so on….she remembered the story of Ginga.  She visited the Fund’s website, found the loan application online, applied and was approved for a guaranteed loan of $10,000.  With this support, she was able to open the restaurant and buy the equipment she needed to grow her business into what it is today.

Lisa has always wanted to open her own restaurant.  After years of working for others, she really wanted to create a place that cares about its’ employees as they are the foundation for any business.  Before she opened Babes in the Woods Eatery, she was working as the lead cook at the Woodstone Residence, a treatment center for young people with eating disorders.  When the center and her job was moving to Vancouver, she decided to stay on Galiano.  She says, “I decided I am going to do what I really want to do.  After 3 years of watching these brave young women battle this life threatening illness and winning, I took a page from their book and stepped into my future world.”

Living and working on Galiano has its’ challenges and that is one of the reasons the Galiano Community Loan Fund was started by a group of local residents.  Lisa says that she is most grateful to receive the loan as, “The fund has provided me with more than just financial assistance.  They did their due diligence in regards to my business plan, acting as mentors to me.  Their sound advice and feedback are tools that are crucial to me.”   She does face challenges that are common on the Island with the main concern being staffing.  She is asking, “How do I keep them year round?  How do they make a living?  How do I make a living?  Do they have the skill set to do the job?”  She says flexibility is very important and some decisions may not make the best business sense.  But, on Galiano where human resources are scarce, you need to adapt to the available resources.

Lisa is working hard to make Babes in the Woods a thriving little business.  She says there is a plan to move the restaurant to a property owned by the business!  While knowing that it is not going to be a straightforward or an easy process, she feels this move is working to ensure the future of her little business.  She looks forward to the next phase of her business as she says that she’s learned that challenges can often make us stronger. 

Contact:  lisagauvreau@gmail.com

http://galianoisland.com/babes-woods-restaurant

 

What is the Galiano Community Loan Fund?

(information from their website)

The Fund was created by Galiano Islanders who have come together as lenders to the Fund to support borrowers in the community who:

  •  • want to start or expand a business on the island
  •  • need access to affordable housing on the island
  •  • want to develop marketable skills to use on Galiano
  •  • have a worthwhile project that will benefit the community

 How does the Galiano Community Loan Fund work?

The Galiano Community Loan Fund operates in partnership with CCEC Credit Union.

The Fund receives loan proceeds from supporters who have lent money to the Fund and these loan proceeds are deposited at CCEC.  In turn, CCEC administers loans made to borrowers that are guaranteed by the Fund.

The pooled loan proceeds at CCEC earn interest and the earned interest is distributed to the supporters who have lent money to the Fund as a return on their loans.  Some supporters choose to forego receiving a return on their loans to the Fund.

Visit their website for more information if you want to be a Lender or a Borrower.  

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"There is no Secwepemc consent for Kinder Morgan" say the Secwepemcul'ecw Assembly.

Secwepemc elders, youth, children and families are calling for an immediate shutdown of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline in light of the forest fires raging through their territory. They fear the pipeline poses a serious safety hazard. They also say the unprecedented increase in fires is evidence of global warming created, in part, by Alberta tar sands oil transported by Kinder Morgan.

"We are in a critical state of emergency dealing with the impacts of climate change,” said Secwepemc teacher Dawn Morrison, adding “this includes catastrophic flooding and fires, as well as social issues such as poverty, increased violence against our women and high rates of death from substance abuse in our communities.”  

Morrison, founder of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty, says “the health of our families and communities relies heavily on our ability to harvest wild salmon and access clean drinking water, both of which are at risk if the Kinder Morgan pipeline was ruptured or impacted by the fires.”

The Secwepemc’ulecw Assembly is demanding a moratorium on any pipeline proposing to transport crude or diluted bitumen through their vast traditional territory where they are stewards of the forests, fields and waterways that flow from the Rockies on their way to the ocean.

The Assembly met last month to reaffirm its territorial title and authority saying, “We have never provided and will never provide our collective free, prior and informed consent - the minimal international standard - to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline Project.

We explicitly and irrevocably refuse its passage through our territory. Investors take note, there is no Secwepemc consent for Kinder Morgan. Kinder Morgan will not pass through Secwepemc Territory.”

To view the Secwepemcul'ecw Assembly Declaration visit: secwepemculecw.org

For interviews contact:

Jeffrey McNeil – 416.720.4358

Kanahus Manuel – 250.852.9002 or 323.804.5106

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