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"There is no Secwepemc consent for Kinder Morgan" say the Secwepemcul'ecw Assembly.

Secwepemc elders, youth, children and families are calling for an immediate shutdown of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline in light of the forest fires raging through their territory. They fear the pipeline poses a serious safety hazard. They also say the unprecedented increase in fires is evidence of global warming created, in part, by Alberta tar sands oil transported by Kinder Morgan.

"We are in a critical state of emergency dealing with the impacts of climate change,” said Secwepemc teacher Dawn Morrison, adding “this includes catastrophic flooding and fires, as well as social issues such as poverty, increased violence against our women and high rates of death from substance abuse in our communities.”  

Morrison, founder of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty, says “the health of our families and communities relies heavily on our ability to harvest wild salmon and access clean drinking water, both of which are at risk if the Kinder Morgan pipeline was ruptured or impacted by the fires.”

The Secwepemc’ulecw Assembly is demanding a moratorium on any pipeline proposing to transport crude or diluted bitumen through their vast traditional territory where they are stewards of the forests, fields and waterways that flow from the Rockies on their way to the ocean.

The Assembly met last month to reaffirm its territorial title and authority saying, “We have never provided and will never provide our collective free, prior and informed consent - the minimal international standard - to the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain Pipeline Project.

We explicitly and irrevocably refuse its passage through our territory. Investors take note, there is no Secwepemc consent for Kinder Morgan. Kinder Morgan will not pass through Secwepemc Territory.”

To view the Secwepemcul'ecw Assembly Declaration visit: secwepemculecw.org

For interviews contact:

Jeffrey McNeil – 416.720.4358

Kanahus Manuel – 250.852.9002 or 323.804.5106

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CCEC is pleased to co-promote the Global Divestment Week, May 5-13,with the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty, one of our member-owners.


Back in 2014, CCEC Credit Union was granted intervenor status in the National Energy Board hearings for the Kinder Morgan pipeline on behalf of our members, including Yarrow Ecovillage, whose homes and organic farm is on the pipeline route. The process was deeply flawed, and many intervenors pulled out of the hearings, citing them as ‘unfair’ and ‘biased’. Unfortunately, of course, the pipeline has been approved, without full consent of Indigenous Peoples and concerned community members.


Today we invite you to participate in the Global Divestment Week being led by 350.org, and encourage you to divest in Kinder Morgan, as well as other dirty fossil fuel companies. We have created a peer to peer podcast with Dawn Morrison, founder and chair of the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty, with Tammy Lea Meyer, co-chair of our board.

 

 This podcast explores some key points of entry into a journey of better understanding how Indigenous land and food systems intra-act in both complementary and contentious ways, and highlights some key issues, concerns and strategies that cross fertilize Indigenous food sovereignty, sustainable energy, and climate justice with the divestment campaigns and hopeful economics. The podcast is a beautiful expression of the ways in which we can work across cultures to prevent any further damage to the forests, fields and waterways that are the basis of the food system as a whole.

 

CCEC and the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty encourages divestment from fossil fuels, and supports investment in community economic development and sustainable energy plans. These are ways we can all personally take action and empower ourselves in creating a thriving future where the ancient ways of being in the world can inform how we can be in right relationship with the land, water and food that is the basis of the economic system that we all benefit from.


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Say NO to Kinder Morgan.

The National Energy Board has approved the expansion of the Kinder Morgan pipeline with numerous conditions.  “It was always likely to be approved.  But we know this megaproject is not in the economic and social interests of our members” says Helesia Luke, CCEC Board Member.  Vancouver Mayor Robertson says, “NEB pipeline process a 'sham,' new Liberal plan not much better.”  Peter McCartney, Climate Campaigner with the Wilderness Committee says, “The NEB has ignored and wasted the time of countless communities, First Nations and individuals who have stood up to oppose this irresponsible pipeline proposal.” 

McCartney continues by saying, “British Columbians have made it crystal clear this pipeline is not welcome in our communities.  No new process is going to change the widespread Indigenous opposition, the unacceptable risk of a spill, the massive climate impacts or the shoddy economics of this project.”

You may recall that CCEC Credit Union was granted Intervenor status, the only financial institution to do so.  We held a public forum in June 2014, over concern that the NEB process was not open, accessible and objective.  We wanted to make the debate more public and complete.  Read the blog

We need everyone to turn out to the meetings in the coming months to show Ottawa and the rest of the country that when we say no – we mean it.  We also need to turn the heat up on our MPs in the Lower Mainland.  Write letters, call offices, show up at events.  Our representatives must put a stop to this! 

Speak Out Against Kinder Morgan!  Learn more – see the map posted by the Wilderness Committee of community and First Nation concerns, and a pledge form where you can find out details of the meetings as they become clear.

 

BACKGROUND:

Click the articles for more information:

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Ben West, CCEC member,  has been an outspoken environmental campaign organizer and social commentator for over a decade.  His newest project is The Great Climate Race, a crowdfunding run for local solar energy projects.  Climate change is the biggest risk we all face.  It has been described by the Pentagon as a “threat multiplier” leading to greater global instability.  We have no choice but to make a transition towards renewable energy and smarter land use and transportation.  The only question is will we do it in time.  It will be very difficult to deal with the large scale changes needed without dealing with underlying issues of inequality.  

“I see this as a way to give people something meaningful to do to address climate change.” 

For over almost 15 years, Ben West has been working as an activist and organizer.  His focus has been on climate change and other  environmental issues but he has also dedicated himself to making the links with social issues and doing First Nations rights related solidarity work.

 

Why am I a member of CCEC?

I feel strongly that local autonomy and community involvement are critical to
solving the social and environmental problems that we face.
The concentration of wealth and power in the big banks is a huge problem.
CCEC embodies my values and puts them into practice.
I love knowing that the money I put in the bank is being invested
in responsible ways that helps my fellow community members.

 

As the Executive Director for TankerFreeBC, he has spent the last 5 years working to stop the Enbridge and Kinder Morgan oil pipelines and associated oil tankers.  He says, “It can be frustrating spending so much time trying to stop bad ideas from becoming a reality.”  He realizes that if he is successful at his job basically nothing happens.  He continues, “A nightmare doesn't become real but still the status quo is not sustainable and so much more needs to be done. “ 

While Ben has always talked about energy alternatives and climate solutions, he has wanted to do more.  Last year, while running in the East Side 10k, he realized that his new hobby was actually a doorway into a new opportunity to organize people around the solutions he was eager to focus on.

He tells the story that was the genesis of The Great Climate Race: I was part way up a hill close to the start of the race and saw a group of people with placard ahead of me. I felt guilty. What were they protesting? Was this race supporting a company doing harm in the world? Was the event negatively affecting the community? As I got closer I realized that these protesters were actually a cheer squad. I had spent so many years surrounded by signs that said STOP this or STOP that I had a time imagining people holding signs that simply said GO! I was so energized by their support and the event itself that I entered a bunch more races and was repeatedly blown away by the generosity and determination of this community.

The inaugural Great Climate Race will be on November 8th at Stanley Park in Vancouver to raise awareness about climate change and funds for local community solar projects.  They will donate the solar panels to non-profit community groups.  His objective is to see that everyone involved experiences a hands on connection with energy alternatives to help spread awareness that the solutions exist today.  Also, he says, “It’s a great way to connect our health as individuals with the health of the planet.”

 

 

For more information and to get involved, contact Ben West.

Ben@TheGreatClimateRace.com

twitter @BenWest or @ClimateRace

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The National Energy Board (NEB) review of the Kinder Morgan pipeline project is not an open, fair and unbiased assessment serving the best interests of the public, in the opinion of Robyn Allan.  "The game is rigged," she writes.  Consequently, Ms. Allan (an independent economist and former ICBC CEO) has chosen to withdraw from the NEB review process; her letter outlines her concerns and provides good supporting evidence: The NEB has adopted an exceptionally narrow scope, and has deemed substantial public concerns as "inadmissible". The NEB has adopted practices that subvert procedural fairness and principles of natural justice.  And, the NEB is biased in favour of the proponent, and the interests of the resource industry, and does not serve the greater public interest.   

Ms. Allan's analysis and questions, as an intervenor, have been excellent and on point for more than a year.  Her efforts to scrutinize the project proposal have to be commended.  She has no stake in the project and has represented a broad public interest in her views.  Her decision to withdraw as an intervenor, along with the withdrawal of Marc Eliesen last month, is another sorry comment on the lack of integrity of this regulatory review. 

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Conversations for Responsible Economic Development (CRED) is a great source for information on the BC economy and proposed mega-projects.  The CRED research provides an important resource to CCEC as we assess the Kinder Morgan proposal for the Trans Mountain Pipeline.  In particular, CRED observes that the oil and gas industry is only a small part of the BC  economy (Gross Domestic Product) and unlikely to generate significant sustained employment gains. 

The CRED Blog and newsletter are great public resources. 

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More input from our Members:

Let’s get away from fossil-fuel based economics.  Thank you for standing against this pipeline plan! 

No. Never. Not now.  Not ever.  We need to focus on green, renewable technologies not dirty, polluting tar sands for profits!

I am unequivocally opposed to this pipeline.  There are too many reasons to list – it is unsafe for people; it promotes climate change; the NEB is undemocratic; it ignores First Nations rights and title; it support a corrupt industry; it does not benefit the people who are most directly harmed by its construction or potential accidents.  No!  No!  No! Thank you.

No more pipelines. We need to invest in cleaner forms of energy.

DO NOT BUILD IT!! PLEASE. 

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Our members are sharing their thoughts with us as we prepare our submission. CCEC is the only financial institution granted intervenor status on the Kinder Morgan Pipeline inquiry.

Share your thoughts on ccecdiscussion.org or send an email to Joanne.   

Being an elder – the thought of the environmental ramifications of this and the affect it will have on my grandchildren’s lives is heart breaking! Please Vote No!

No pipeline with Bitumen inside. Refine it at the source. No extra tankers. Keep the wealth here in BC.

 

Oil spills will make the creatures unhappy. But most likely DEAD!

 

Building more pipelines is the last thing we should be doing. We should be working to lessen our dependence on oil. Stop exporting to China, and ultimately shut down the Tar Sands. Canada should be concerned with preserving and protecting the vast tracts of wilderness we have. Here in the Lower Mainland we can be investing in infrastructure for sustainable transportation.

 

Kinder Morgan’s history of spills shows me they do not care about anything but profits.

 

It is not worth the environmental and cultural risk to BC. We should invest the $$’s in alternatives. We, as a planet can’t afford more carbon in the atmosphere. I am against this pipeline because I think the environmental risks to our coast far exceed the potential benefits of the pipeline. I am concerned about the risks to our coastal water of increased tanker traffic, as well as to our rivers and streams of potential pipeline spills. The global threat of increased climate change that the processing and burning of bitumen is also a very significant concern for myself and my family.

 

Persons on disability receive $906 / month, which has not been increased for at least 7 years. The BC Gov’t says there’s no money to enable an increase. They should stop subsidizing companies like Kinder Morgan and instead invest in all the viable opportunities for ecologically sounds, profitable businesses, thereby creating long-term employment and greater economic growth. Then maybe they’d be able to lift their constituents out of poverty!

 

I’m from the Nlaka’pamux Nation, located in the Southern Interior of BC. The Trans Mountain pipeline goes directly through my territory, through mountains, hunting grounds, by water sources with salmon and through foraging and berry picking grounds. A massive rupture took place last year by Merritt, BC and shortly after, closer to Hope, BC. The proposal to double the pipeline and increase the amount of crude oil going through my territory is a very grave risk. I do not support the tar sands, I don’t support seeing more tankers, and I do not want anymore crude oil going through my territory. All My Relations.

 

My planet is sick and so are many of the people who inhabit it.  We need to make decisions that benefit our planet and its people.  “Profits” needs to be eliminated from the process.  Creating jobs and income at the risk of destroying our planet needs to stop.  There is no risk worth the damage that the pipelines can create.  The risk is too high and not worth the investment. 

 

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CCEC hosted a community 'inquiry' into the proposed Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion (Edmonton to Burnaby), June 14th 10am-1pm at the Croatian Cultural Centre.  Several members and others came out to learn and debate the merits of the project.

CCEC has been granted 'intervenor' status in the National Energy Board review process, and is the only financial institution to do so.  CCEC is concerned that the NEB process is not open, accessible and objective.  CCEC is making an effort to make the debate more public and complete.

At this workshop presentations were welcomed from Kennedy Stewart, MP Burnaby Douglas, Sven Biggs, representing Forest Ethics, and Liz McDowell from Conversations for Responsible Economic Development.   

Others attending made calls for citizen action; the Dogwood Initiative is a voter based province-wide campaign.  'BROKE' is a Burnaby residents' project. 

The Kinder Morgan proposal to move diluted bitumen was criticized on many fronts; environmental, First Nations, democratic process, public policy efficacy, business case, and risk distribution.  

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