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Wild Salmon Caravan (WSC) is a project led by the Working Group on Indigenous Food Sovereignty (WGIFS) in collaboration with the Wild Salmon Defenders Alliance. The project engages multiple Indigenous and non-Indigenous Elders, activists, researchers and lawyers.  2019 will be the 5th annual WSC.  Dawn Morrison, Co-Founder/Chair of the WGIFS says, “The strength of our work lies in our networks and our ability to link with over 100+ organizations to leverage support, access funding, and co-develop programs, promotion, and public education materials, as well as plan logistics, and host community arts build workshops, feasts, ceremonies and visual and performing arts events.”  

The WSC, with guidance and direction from the Salish Council of Matriarchs, raises awareness of the issues surrounding the declining health and abundance of our most important Indigenous food, wild salmon. They organize community arts and cultural engagement activities that brings together Rainbow Peoples (peoples of all creeds and cultures) in their public education campaign and celebrations of the spirit of wild salmon.

The WSC mobilizes traditional ecological knowledge, values, strategies, practices and protocols that have persisted throughout the process of colonization. The WSC media highlights  teachings on sustainability of wild salmon fisheries and how it can be applied in the present day reality.  Sustainability of our efforts ultimately lies in the extended networks where Indigenous food, social and ceremonial fisheries knowledge lives, and the large volunteer basis on which the WGIFS and WSC planning teams work. We activate sharing and trading of knowledge and food and revitalize inter-tribal networks, and we promote and generate awareness of how to increase the communities’ ability to respond to their own needs for food in a way that affirms the regenerative paradigm that underlies Indigenous cosmologies and worldviews. 

In 2018, the eight-day caravan started in Vancouver with a parade on September 22 and finished in Chase at Adams Lake on September 29.  For more information and to get involved in the 2019 WSC visit their website  Like and Follow them on Facebook 
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Get out and VOTE in the upcoming municipal elections.  Voting day is October 20th.  Advance Polls are now open. 

Read the Vancouver Voter's Guide to learn more about the candidates and their positions on issues that are important to you, like housing.  Attend candidate meetings.  

Learn more at the City of Vancouver website. 

 

 

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Proportional Representation 
What is it?  What does it mean to me?  
Do BC elections put the right 'representatives' in the legislature?  Many want the system changed. And now change is being proposed.

BC residents will participate in an electoral reform vote this fall. You will be asked two questions:

1. Which should British Columbia use for elections to the Legislative Assembly? 

  • The current First Past the Post (FPTP) voting system. or 
  • A proportional representation(PR)  voting system.

2. If British Columbia adopts a proportional representation voting system, which of the following voting systems do you prefer?

  • Dual Member Proportional (DMP)
  • Mixed Member Proportional (MMP)
  • Rural-Urban PR 

Learn more:

  • Fair Vote Canada in BC is pro - Proportional Representation. They say that first-past-the-post delivers majority governments to parties with 39% of the vote. With proportional representation, if a party earns 30% of the vote, they get 30% of the seats. 
  • The “No Proportional Representation in BC Society” favours keeping our current, “First Past the Post” or “FPT
  • Get involved and participate in the conversations and debates. 
Share your thoughts on this issue.
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A research project is underway to consult Canadians about how human rights are to be incorporated into trade agreements.  Towards a Socially Responsible Trade Policy is organized by a team from the University of Montreal and the project is seeking input from all Canadians on how we see NAFTA and other trade deals.  There is an online survey, and a day of hearings on Sept 22nd in Vancouver.  

This is an independent, non-government project.  It uses a social justice framework, in a way similar to the approach of all community developers, and the Solidarity Economy activists in Montreal. Community level organizing always features human rights, this research pushes us to apply the same principles more effectively in the realm of international trade. 

Take part!

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Come see new paintings from member, Suzo Hickey.

Two new paintings arrived and are displayed in our lobby.  

 

Thank you, Suzo, for allowing us to show your work in Vancouver. 

For more information and to purchase her paintings visit her website. 

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Naomi Klein

Naomi Klein's newest book is called NO IS NOT ENOUGH, and it is a call out to communities, thinking people, and progressive politicians. She sat down with Charlie Demers at a Writers Festival event on June 24th and laid out the essential arguments for constructive change - environmentally, socially, and economically. 

At the core, she emphasizes that resistance, saying no and protesting, is not going to be enough.  She contends that 'reacting' to a rapacious agenda the degrades the planet and consigns millions of people to poverty, or worse, is only a first step.  She sees the need for progressives to fashion a strong, fresh, and vital agenda that can contest the field in democracies, especially the USA. And also, she sees the need for communities, municipalities, and local governments to pick up the bigger challenges - and not wait for 'big government' to take action. 

The book largely pivots on the new directions, statements, and behavior of the new leader of the free world.  She entertainingly and succinctly lays out the 'brand management' tactics of the new president.  There are echoes of her previous books No Logo, and This Changes Everything. But she also includes observations on the recent BC election and the UK election.  In those cases she was heartened by the championing of truly progressive and exciting policies, broadening the discussion of what can be done by government. She noted that these visions were supported by voters.

The argument goes further than electoral politics, however. Ordinary people and community-based initiatives are also needed - both to effect action and to hold governments accountable.  Naomi Klein was referencing the Women's March and other events that are prompting people to get involved and take greater responsibility for a whole host of issues; immigration and refugees, housing, health services, education, transportation... In this context, CCEC and the many community groups we bring together are primary examples.

The challenge to the hundreds in the audience that evening was simple, 'It is up to you, us, to develop a vigorous, positive plan for the future; and put it in place.'

 

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Smarter.  Brighter.  Better.

CCEC is converting to a new banking system on JUNE 1, 2016.  There will be service interruptions from Tuesday, May 31 at 3pm to Wednesday, June 1 in the late afternoon.  If you have further questions, please visit our website for more information or phone 604.254.4100.

BE PREPARED

During this conversion period, if you have any questions concerning your account we encourage you to contact the branch through email info@ccec.bc.ca or by phone to 604.254.4100.

After conversion, if you have specific problem with your card or online access, please provide us with as much detail as possible about the issue, to assist us in tracking down the source of the issue.  Details would include the date and time, location (ATM or retail outlet), exactly what you were trying to do, and the exact error message.

Nothing is perfect and we ask you to check on your Future Bill Payments to confirm that bills were paid if they were scheduled during the conversion period.  Bill payments scheduled for June 1 will not be processed at the beginning of the day as usual, but will be processed in the afternoon, after the conversion is complete.

Q:  Why are we converting the banking system?

A:  We are converting to a new banking system to provide you with increased reliability and to increase our capacity to provide you with new services.  During the conversion, we will be doing everything we can to minimize any member impact; however, there will be some changes that will be necessary and important to note.  For updates, visit our website at www.ccec.bc.ca .

Q: When is this happening?  And, can I get money from an ATM, do online banking, and make purchases?

A:  We are converting to this new banking system from Tuesday, May 31 at 3pm to Wednesday, June 1 in the late afternoon.  

 

BE AWARE:
You can deposit cheques or cash in an ATM.
BUT,
the funds
deposited at ATM’s during this period will not be available for withdrawals.

 

Q: Will my cheques and pre-authorized debits and credits be cleared?

A: On Tuesday, May 31, we will process the clearing files as usual.  We anticipate we will next process the clearing file on June 1 in the afternoon, after our upgraded banking system is up and running.

If you have important transactions or special requests from May 31 to June 1, please get in touch with us ASAP so that we can address your concerns.

Q:  So, what can and can’t I do during this time?

A: See our Service Interruption At A Glance chart:

 

Telephone Support

Branch Banking

ATM & POS

Online, Mobile & Telephone Banking

Monday, May 30

 

Closed as usual

Available

Available

Tuesday, May 31 before 3pm

Business as usual for account and transaction processing up to 3pm.

Open 10am-3pm

Available

Available

Tuesday, May 31 after 3pm

We are available to answer questions until 5pm.

Closed

Limited. We cannot process transactions after 3pm.

Not Available. Transactions cannot be processed after 3pm.

Wednesday, June 1

We are available to answer questions from 10:00am to 5:00pm.

Closed

Limited. We cannot process transactions until late afternoon.

Not Available. Transactions cannot be processed until late afternoon.

Thursday, June 2

Open 10am-5pm business as usual

Open 10am-5pm business as usual

Available

Available

 

Q: What changes will I notice in the new banking system?

A:  We’ve listened. The new system reflects a few of your requests.  You will see more features and easier navigation.  The system will provide greater reliability and give us the capacity to add new services.

  • NEW in Online Banking: You can download account activity to a PDF file; and we’ve added the Recurring Bill Payments feature to save you time to pay the same amount on regularly scheduled bills.
  • NEW in Telephone Banking: The phone numbers will be changing.  The new number for local calls is 778-588-6811 and toll-free is 1 844-588-6811.  Listen carefully as the order on the menu options has also changed and we do not have a Loan Payment option.  Navigation is easier.  Changes include:
  • Press * to go back to the previous option;
  • Use * key for decimal point when entering amount of the bill.
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On behalf of the board, we are pleased to announce that Tracey Kliesch will be joining CCEC Credit Union as our General Manager as of May 15, 2016. Tracey is coming to CCEC after more than 12 years at Vancity in both operations and community investment. 

“It’s an honour and pleasure to welcome such a strong advocate for co-ops and community organizations to CCEC,” remarked Tammy Lea Meyer, Co-chair of the Board of Directors. “As a champion of co-operative economics and an active leader in the community, we are extremely pleased to have her take on this leadership role at our credit union.”

Tracey has spent the last five years as a Community Investment Portfolio Manager, where she has focused on building meaningful partnerships with mission-based organizations, as well as managing the Youth Community Advisory Committee and online forum. Outside of her work with Vancity, Tracey teaches Cooperatives and Community Economic Development at BCIT, and has worked internationally to promote and strengthen the cooperative model and help build the cooperative movement.

Ms. Meyer continued, “CCEC stands for Community Congress for Economic Change, and as an agent of change, we promote social justice and economic democracy.  It is clear to us that Tracey shares this commitment.  Her proven managerial skills in the financial service industry and a broad understanding of the social profit sector give us confidence that she will represent the values of our members and member communities.  She is well prepared to take on this leadership role at CCEC.”

“I am very excited and deeply honoured to become CCEC’s next GM and I look forward to stewarding the credit union’s continued success,” said Ms. Kliesch. “I have had the pleasure of serving community members in Squamish, Vancouver, East Vancouver and Burnaby for over 12 years with Vancity and look forward to continuing that work in support of CCEC’s members and community organizations. I look forward to working with the Board, our managers, our union and staff to continue to build an organization that is sustainably successful and true to our founding values. I am proud to take the helm of this local, autonomous and independent credit union that so clearly lives and advocates for cooperative values.”

Ms. Kliesch will be replacing Ross Gentleman who is retiring after leading the credit union for three years, having been an active volunteer and contributor for over 35 years. Although he will be missed as GM, we expect he will continue to volunteer in some capacity.

CCEC Credit Union provides financial services to non-profits, co-ops, social enterprises and progressive small businesses, and to individuals affiliated with these community organizations.  As a community development credit union, CCEC has worked with many projects associated with housing, childcare, health, environmental stewardship, gender equality, and free expression.


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The loose, no rules, improv, learn by ear band…a sister project of the Carnival Band.
Free for kids from the neighbourhood.

The value of music education has eroded so dramatically that most schools are cutting music from their curriculum.  Even the after school music programs are considered too structured.   Enter The Greenhorn Community Music Project, started by Brenda Koch, a Carnival Band member and elementary school teacher.  She laughs when asked why she started the project saying, “Not everyone fits into the wild, crazy, eclectic, energetic vibe of the Carnival Band who have over 400 songs in their repertoire and always mix up the 10 songs they will play at a show.”  Armed with a ‘Dr. Suess style logo designed by local artist, Jeremy Glen, the Greenhorn Community Music Project thinks big and wants to see 100 kids in their workshops learning and growing through music. 

How can you help?

  • Donate instruments, music stands
  • Spread the word!  Like us and Share on Facebook 
  • Come to their first performance  Dec 21st 6pm with the Carnival Band at Granville Island Winter Solstice
  • Join the fun, contribute your musical talents and expertise.
  • Donate funds to support them and keep them going in year 2. Send a cheque payable to Transforming Education to 2511 Ave, Vancouver, BC  V5M 1H1

The Greenhorn project provides kids of all ages with musical leadership, mentorship and instruments to play.  There is someone at each workshop (aka practice) who will take the time to help newcomers understand and learn.  Also the workshops are from 3:30-5pm on Mondays so youngsters can participate.  Just like the Carnival Band, the Greenhorn aims to teach people to learn by ear like a professional musician, pay attention to what others are doing and to learn to improvise.  When you think about it, these are all life-time skills that help to build confidence and self-esteem – and fit in with the Carnival Band style if they want to join them.

It has taken five years to see the project launch with their first workshop in September, 2015.  Through word of mouth, 21 people showed up; and at one workshop, they had 8 newcomers.  One person heard of them through Facebook and all kids are from the Grandview Woodland area.  The kids range in age from 4 to over 60.  They have a roster of 25 or so people and average 12-15 at each workshop. 

They have funds to support the project for the school year till June, 2016.  They are proud to be the recipient of the East Feast 2015 award, funds from CLICK (contributing to lives of inner city kids), the Vancouver Foundation who provided a $10,000 feasibility grant and a private donor.  Most of the funds support the professional fees for Tim Sars, Musical Director.  They have two interns, Charlotte (16 years old) and Marlo (17 years old) who started with the Carnival Band when they were pre-teens.  They both provide mentorship; Marlo works on marketing, outreach, and fundraising; while Charlotte provides admin support and was responsible for initiating their partnership with the Transforming Education Society, which allows them to issue tax receipts.  It is with this partnership and Instruments of Change they broaden their connections with the community and build their network.

The Greenhorn Community Music Program making a difference in our community.  Support their project. 

 

 

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The New Economy – still mostly a concept, lots of people have a different vision for the kind of economic environment we are all moving into.  What was the vision for the Impact Economy Whistler, event held in October attended by CCEC Board Members, Tammy Lee Meyer and Marty Frost?  If there was a common word that could be applied to all the visions that were present, it would be “open” as in “open-source” technology - hardware and software; and “open value networks” as a way of organizing groups of people who choose to work together. 

The people who showed up all saw themselves of members of an emerging economy.  They were computer software and hardware engineers, community developers, co-op advocates.  And if there was a common word that could be applied to all the vision that was present, it would be “open”.  The computer people were all working on developing new generations of computer operating systems, applications, communication protocols and hardware, all open source.  Open Source is a concept applied to developments (computer hardware and software primarily at this point) that have no ownership applied to them.  A piece of open source software, for example, carries no license, no proprietary rights attached to it.  Anyone has a right to download a piece of open source software, modify it and put it back up on line for open sharing.  The same principles are being applied to hardware as well. 

Some of those present were also employing “open value networks” as their form of organization.  No incorporation, no legal “rights of a natural person” applied.  Simply a group of people who choose to work together, share projects, share any resulting revenue that may be produced, well, openly.  A couple of examples that people may wish to check out on line would be Sensorica, in Montreal (www.sensorica.co), or 99% Media, also in Montreal ( www.99media.org). Neither has a legal structure, they are networks of workers who get together on a project-by-project basis, and share facilities, tools and revenue. 

The other significant “group” of people were the community development folks, most of whom are involved with local, non-State currencies.  Among these was BC’s own Michael Linton, founder of the LETS system that some of us will remember from its 40 year or so history in and around the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island.  The Mutual Aid Network was represented as well, and profiled for us their highly successful time-banking system they have developed under a co-op umbrella in Madison Wisconsin.  Time-banking is in some ways another form of local currency, certainly a local trading system. (www.mutualaidnetwork.org)

In this video podcast, Michel Bauwens chats with Art Brock, Michael Linton, and Matthew Slater about money and new currencies: accounting systems, "open money", current-sees, exchange in the post-monetary economy, trust, and value exchanges.

Is this to be an aspect of the “New Economy”?  An escape from individual ownership – or any form of ownership at all – into an economic paradigm based on sharing?  If you have a need it will be there for you, if you have something to offer you have ways to offer it, and all free of state-based currency transactions?  To people like me, who has spent most of my life assisting people to work in more sharing – but certainly “legally” structured – forms of economic relationships, it raises all sorts of questions:  how scalable can these organizations be?  How are disputes – those that are now “settled” through the market – be settled?  how would “value” of goods and services be determined?  These are questions that need to be answered as we move forward.  For my part I am thankful that there are people out there who have the passion and nerve to just get out there and do it.  Test these models in the crucible of the capitalist economy in which we live, find the challenges and develop solutions. 

Marty Frost

For more information: 

http://www.impacteconomy.io  and other podcasts  https://soundcloud.com/impact-economy

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