CCEC Blog
Search
 

Did you know that:

·         In BC, 50% of all seniors live on an income of less than $26,000/year?

·         The 2018 Homeless Count found that 23% were over the age of 55?

·         It is estimated that by 2038, about one in four people living in B.C. will be a senior?

Seniors face many issues and challenges that include social isolation, loneliness and poverty.  The Seniors 411 Society offers programs that reduce social isolation, increase social inclusion, and are a critical component of any anti-poverty strategy.  The Society’s submission on a Poverty Reduction Strategy for Seniors (Feb. 2018) states that the BC plan must address both increasing income and helping reduce or manage costs.  They also provided recommendations in seven areas that include housing, transportation, food insecurity and community based programs.  BC is still the only province in Canada without a poverty reduction plan.

In the 411 Seniors Centre Society submission, they emphasize the importance of community and social connections for seniors.  Seniors have told staff at the Society that they feel a loss of community if they move to a different and unfamiliar neighbourhood.  However, aging in place and finding quality, affordable rental homes in Vancouver, is a challenge for seniors on low and fixed incomes.  The new 411 Seniors Centre (anticipate ground breaking in Spring 2019) is a step to providing more seniors social housing.  It will have approximately 50 units of social housing, a multi-purpose centre and be located close to other amenities and services they need.

Leslie Remund, Executive Director for the 411 Seniors Centre Society, says, “We are a peer led membership organization that aims to cushion the impact of poverty by providing information, referral and advocacy services, a drop in for socialization & connection& daily activities that promote aging with pride and curiosity.”   The Centre strives to enhance the quality of life of seniors by adding a collective voice on seniors’ issues such as affordable housing, income, and health services.   Join us!”

Find out more about the 411 Seniors Centre Society.  Support their capital campaign for their new building.

(This year, CCEC was pleased to support a fundraiser for the 411 Seniors Centre Society.)

Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

Interest rates in Canada are climbing so if you’re on the verge of going into debt over holiday spending this year, you might want to reconsider.

To get through the holiday season with as little financial pain as possible, here a few tips to keep from overspending (which can be hard!):

Make a budget: Figure out how much you can afford to spend over the season and then work from there. For example, if you can afford $200, then make a list of what you think you need to buy and work backwards. And don’t be afraid to cut – whether it’s trimming the decorations, making your own cookies, or opting for a thoughtful card instead of a gift for someone.

Do go out with your list: Shopping centres and malls are packed at this time of year and it’s easy to get distracted and over spend. The best way to avoid this is to have a clear list of who you need to shop for and what you plan to buy for them.

Use cash: Paying for everything with cash or using your Interac Debit card makes it much easier to track your spending. Carrying a few bills along with you can ensure you stick to the essentials and avoid impulse purchases.

Have honest conversations: Avoid awkward moments by setting a price limit ahead of time for gifts among friends and family. This way no one is caught off guard by pricey or less fancy gifts. You might also find that you’d prefer to skip the gift giving altogether and opt for a night out or another kind of treat you can share.

Try a Secret Santa with your family: This is a fun way to set gift giving limits among family. Give everyone a budget of no more than $30 and one person to buy for. That way everyone gets a gift and no one has to break the bank.

We wish all our members the best for the holiday season. 

(reprinted from the cutrust newsletter)

Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

Big Oil

The government is once again throwing good money after bad in Alberta - https://globalnews.ca/news/4773317/alberta-oil-boost-federal-bailouts/

The above article chronicles a long and checkered history of government money flowing into private business with minimal checks and balances.

Yes, there are jobs at stake. Yes, there are livelihoods on the line. But giving money to special interests and expecting us to all be better off is naive. And deciding those in the oil industry are more deserving of support is preferential. The government is not elected to play favourites.

Especially when these types of stimuli have proven unreliable, and sometimes even counterproductive. Then again, it does a lot to illustrate the fact the government's favourites are big business.

Bombardier has benefited handsomely from bailouts while laying off employees and giving their Executive Management millions in bonuses. What is the price tag for all this loose money? Your guess is as good as mine: https://globalnews.ca/news/2624709/how-much-money-does-bombardier-owe-canadians-its-a-secret/

That is not okay. As the market has shown serious signs of sputtering in 2018, it is time to put focused pressure on real solutions that benefit those most in need - not those most in power.

It's time to spend on actual change.

- Denis Flinn
CCEC operates on the unceded territories of the Coast Salish people - Musqueam, Squamish and Tsleil-Waututh

 Photo Courtesy of Bryant Arnold

Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people
Tags: n/a

Image result for yellow vestsSeveral stories in the news feature angry gripes and protests.  Too often the superficial issues get the attention - a carbon tax, a luxury home tax or a pipeline.  Councillor Christine Boyle is represented in a recent piece properly identifying 'inequality', growing inequality, as the key issue.  She is right.

The BC government taxes are an attempt to re-balance taxation, but those who have homes valued in excess of $3M cry out that they are 'victims'. Entitlements, such as those we have given to homeowners and which benefit those at the upper end very handsomely, will not be given up easily.  We need to shine a light on these entrenched economic advantages if we are serious about egalitarianism,  

Many in the 'yellow vest' protests in Paris express their discontentment as added tax burdens are placed on ordinary people.  This is the core sentiment communicated by individuals on the street.  The street, in this case the Champs Élysées, is a venue for conspicuous consumption for the very wealthy, who are obviously distressed, not that the rabble are rising, but that their limo's may need to go elsewhere.  

And then we have the climate conference in Poland, where again rich nations delay action.  A sense of entitlement reigns. The recent IPCC report raised alarm, saying that warming is advancing faster than foreseen.  The BC government issued a new Climate Change Plan, but just as with the Canadian government initiatives to date, the actions are to little and even contradictory.  Vested interests, moneyed interests, such as the oil and gas industry, are not only 'entitled' but well integrated into the political apparatus that we have created. 

The discontentment that is growing may have dramatic implications.  Many, such as Chris Hedges, champion local community organizations as the key counter force to large scale capitalist machinations. 

Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

It's really not scary and it's not complicated. It's just progress. We can either take the next step or sit for another 50 years trying to get first-past-the-post to do what we want.

There will be a confirmation referendum after two elections with proportional representation.

The deadline to mail in your ballot is November 30, 2018!  

Click here for more information on the YES campaign. 

 
Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

"Gold Medal Winner for Recycling," says, Mike McCardell on The Last Word segment featuring CCEC Member Randi-Lee Taylor and her Simply Barefoot Garden business.  Watch the video: 

 

Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

November is Financial Literacy Month in Canada. Throughout the month, we encourage you, our members,  to take control of your finances and reduce financial stress by making a budget, having a savings and debt reduction plan, and understanding your financial rights and responsibilities. 

​Financial literacy is important for the financial well-being of individuals, but also for the economy as a whole. Understanding the basics about money is as essential today as numeracy and basic literacy.​

We know that it isn’t always easy to live within our means, and debt can accumulate quickly. Having a plan to pay off debt will go a long way to reducing financial stress. Spending more than you earn makes you less resilient to economic surprises. A heavy debt load makes you more vulnerable if your financial situation changes or if you need to pay for unexpected expenses.

Learn more at https://www.Canada.ca/financial-literacy-month

We can help. Call us at CCEC to meet with one of our financial advisors. 

Currently rated 3.0 by 10 people

Choose Democracy

The "No" side on Proportional Representation want you to be afraid this Halloween. And every other day.

Make no mistake; the "No" side is using the same scare tactics that got Trump elected. A disturbing irony for a group claiming Proportional Representation will usher in an era of "extreme right-wing" parties and "Nazi fascism".

Does that claim seem a little inflammatory, or hyperbolic? Maybe even irresponsible fear-mongering to divide people? Well, it is. But it's also their official stance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-Tuh2bJapng

Besides being an appalling lie, the ad underscores the "No" side is not operating on facts or good faith. There are valid arguments which could be made from the "No" side, but instead they are trying to scare you. Fear is a powerful motivator, but a terrible policy. These tactics should also make you keenly aware of the fact an argument on facts favours "Yes". How better accounting for each individual vote is opening our province to views currently not even on the political radar is baffling. But it sure is scary...

And if we want a more modern example of a failure in a system, we can look to our 'partners' to the South. They use First Past the Post. Are we supposed to conclude their extreme right-wing ideology is a function of the First Past the Post system? I would say the argument is far more complicated.

But perhaps the better question we should be asking is whether we want our system to be more or less like that of the United States. The answer should be obvious.

Yet it really is not right now. The vote is too close to call, but there is hope: https://theprovince.com/news/bc-politics/mike-smyth-the-yes-side-won-the-first-week-of-the-referendum

Vote "Yes" and tell everyone you know to vote too!

- Denis Flinn

 

Currently rated 3.0 by 5 people
Tags: n/a

Pro Rep Ballot

The municipal election has just wrapped, and the margin of victory made it very clear that every vote counts.

Which is a great reminder: the Proportional Representation referendum is now underway and your vote counts! You can expect to receive a mail-in ballot with the options laid out like you see in the picture that accompanies this blog post.

CCEC is formally standing with the "YES" option as a way to improve democratic representation, and voter engagement. First and foremost: vote!

If you are still not clear on the details, please take a look at the following links with good information into the process and your options:

VotePRBC: https://voteprbc.ca/
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives: https://www.policyalternatives.ca/newsroom/updates/debunking-myths-about-proportional-representation
Leadnow.ca: https://www.leadnow.ca/campaigns/

This is a rare opportunity to move away from a system that creates false majorities (see: 2016 Trump and 2018 Ford), and increase accountability, cooperation and engagement across the political spectrum. Do not let this opportunity pass by without ensuring your name is counted.

-Denis Flinn

Currently rated 3.0 by 5 people
Tags: n/a

Interested in increasing your awareness about the scams that target Canadians? The Competition Bureau Canada has put together information about some of the top scams in the country. Check out The Little Black Book of Scams (2nd edition) and learn tips, red flags, and detailed information about different scams.

Here are three of some of the general red flags to watch out for, according to the Competition Bureau.

  1. Spelling mistakes: Be skeptical of emails, messages or websites that contain misspelled common words; grammar errors that make it difficult to read or expressions that are used incorrectly. Email and web addresses should also be examined closely to see if there are subtle mistakes or differences.
  2. Personal information request: Fraudsters may ask potential victims to provide more personal or financial information than is required for the transaction or discussion. Be suspicious if someone asks for copies of your passport, driver’s licence and social insurance number, or birth date, especially if you don’t know the requestor.
  3. Unsolicited calls: You might get a call from someone claiming that you have a virus on your computer, you owe taxes or there has been fraudulent activity in your bank accounts. Know that legitimate organizations will not call you directly. Hang up and call the organization yourself using the number from a trustworthy source, such as the phone book, their website, or even invoices and account statements.

Every year, Canadians lose millions of dollars to scammers. To find out more about scams in Canada and how you can protect yourself, visit The Little Black Book of Scams. A PDF version is also available.

Currently rated 0.0 by 0 people

Search

home | memberdirectprivacy policy | contact | site map
© 2015 CCEC Credit Union. All Rights Reserved.